Orca fights great white shark

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orca fights great white shark

Killer Whale Vs. Great White Shark by Jerry Pallotta

I must admit that I am addicted to this series right now. The ones that I don’t have in my possession, I have on hold at the library. I took four of them into a sixth-grade classroom I was subbing in the other day and they were an instant hit with the kids. I asked the question on the front of the book to the kids, I had them raise their hands to see which species got the most votes. I then gave them a picture walk of the information contained in the book and then I quickly walked them through how the fight went on at the end of this nonfiction children book. They were all ears, hoping that the species they choose won. Some decided to change their original hypothesis after I told them some of the facts inside the book but I loved how they all were listening and wanting to know the outcome. Afterwards, I had some of the kids wanting to read the books for their read-to-self books. Now, that is a testament to these books.

With bright, colorful, realistic, illustrations these books are a gem. Using a variety of font styles and sizes the information is scattered throughout the pages in an easy to read format. With one side of the page devoted to one species and the other species devoted to the other. I liked how the author compared and contrasted the information of the species inside the book, whether it be its habitat, it’s size, how fast it moves, it’s skeleton or what it eats, etc... Each book also has text boxes with Did You Know? Information and some other text boxes with Fun Facts, Bonus Facts, Important Facts that contain interesting information. At the end of the book, is the duel between the species. I find these duels rather comical as they are like watching a WWW match. Every move, every piece of action is written down so it feels as if you are actually there. In the end, there is only one winner. Will it be the one that you had chosen?

In Killer Whale vs. Great White Shark, this is the book I liked the most. I could have shown almost every page in this book as there were lots of interesting and informative pages in here. Their teeth sizes, the differences in sizes between the males and females plus the differences in their fin sizes, direction of their fins, how individuals look to these species, how they swim, and their brains. Such great information and boy, did this book spark the conversation. I am definitely picking up a copy of this one for myself.

So now I have to wait for the books at the library to come in, can’t wait to see what things I don’t know.
File Name: orca fights great white shark.zip
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Published 03.10.2019

Orcas Vs Shark: Killer Whales Take Down Tiger Shark

Great White Sharks Are Completely Terrified of Orcas

The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias , is considered the most voracious apex predator in temperate marine ecosystems worldwide, playing a key role in controlling ecosystem dynamics. As a result, it is difficult to imagine a great white as prey. Ranging in size from 2. Strangest of all, their livers were missing. The bite marks inflicted, together with confirmed sightings indicate that orcas, Orcinus orca , were responsible for this precisely-targeted predation. Although the opening scene from Jaws II immediately springs to mind, in which an orca washes up with huge bite marks on it, the reality has turned out to be the exact opposite.

All rights reserved. When Alisa Schulman-Janiger heard great white shark carcasses had washed up on South African beaches without their livers a few years ago, she was shocked. In October , tourists in a whale-watching boat off the Farallon Islands, near San Francisco, witnessed two killer whales attack a great white shark and consume its liver. It was, at that time, the first documented sighting of killer whales eating white sharks. The incident sparked new lines of research, as well as some intriguing questions for Schulman-Janiger and many others: How could any ocean predator, even one called a killer whale, dominate the almighty great white? Though no one saw the South African killer whales—also known as orcas—kill the sharks, the parallels to the other attacks made orcas the likely culprits. Overall, the incidents show that interactions between these two predators can have major impacts on the food chain, says Anderson.

The bodies ranged in size from nine feet to 16 feet, but each had large sets of puncture marks near the pectoral fins. The accuracy of these puncture wounds sent scientists into a spiral. The murderer of these sharks knew exactly where to bite to get what they wanted: each of the sharks was missing their liver. This was shocking, as the great white can detect a drop of blood in 25 gallons of water from three miles away. Scientists determined then that only one other predator could pose such a danger to these killing machines, indeed the evidence was in their name: the killer whale. The great white shark has honed its hunting efficiency through millions of years of evolution.

Clash of Killers

But also: killer whales. For almost 15 years, Salvador Jorgensen from the Monterey Bay Aquarium has been studying great white sharks off the coast of California. He and his colleagues would lure the predators to their boats using bits of old carpet that they had cut in the shape of a seal. When the sharks approached, the team would shoot them with electronic tags that periodically emit ultrasonic signals. Underwater receivers, moored throughout Californian waters, detected these signals as the sharks swam by, allowing the team to track their whereabouts over time. In , the team tagged 17 great whites, which spent months circling Southeast Farallon Island and picking off the local elephant seals. But this period of steady hunting ended on November 2 of that year, when two pods of killer whales orcas swam past the islands in the early afternoon.

4 thoughts on “Killer Whale Vs. Great White Shark by Jerry Pallotta

  1. The lovable orca of "Free Willy" fame, also called a killer whale or blackfish, is a stone-cold predator.

  2. The revelation comes from a paper in Nature Scientific Reports by senior research scientist Salvador Jorgensen at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and his colleagues.

  3. It's pretty much common wisdom that the top predator in the ocean is the great white shark (that is, if there isn't a remnant population of.

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