Statistics for people who think they

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statistics for people who think they

Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics by Neil J. Salkind

Written for people who want to learn or brush-up on the basics of statistics but question their abilities, this book offers a step-by-step introduction to the topic. The book begins with an introduction to the language of statistics and then covers descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. Throughout, the author offers readers:

- Difficulty Rating Index for each chapters material

- Tips for doing and thinking about a statistical technique

- Top tens for everything from the best ways to create a graph to the most effective techniques for data collection

- Steps that break techniques down into a clear sequence of procedures

- SPSS tips for executing each major statistical technique

- Practice exercises at the end of each chapter, followed by worked out solutions.

The book concludes with a statistical software sampler and a description of the best Internet sites for statistical information and data resources. Readers also have access to a website for downloading data that they can use to practice additional exercises from the book. Students and researchers will appreciate the books unhurried pace and thorough, friendly presentation.
File Name: statistics for people who think they.zip
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Published 02.03.2019

Why you should love statistics - Alan Smith

Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics Interactive eBook

Should you need additional information or have questions regarding the HEOA information provided for this title, including what is new to this edition, please email sageheoa sagepub. Please include your name, contact information, and the name of the title for which you would like more information. For assistance with your order: Please email us at textsales sagepub. Intuitive and simple to use, it allows you to. While not sacrificing depth, the text makes difficult topics approachable. This texts meets my students where they are and allows them to gain the needed knowledge and appreciation of statistics.

I HATE this book. I hate administration. I hate statistics and taking things that are interesting and reducing them to mathematical formulas and representing them with greek and roman letters. I live in the Bay Area now and I want to be exploring this grand new place an. I live in the Bay Area now and I want to be exploring this grand new place and instead I lug this dead albatross of a book around with me everywhere I go and sometimes sit down with it and fall asleep. Why didn't I enroll in clown school?

The third edition contains many errors, both in the explanations and in the answers to the practice problems. It is a friendly statistic book, it just needs a better editor. Neil J. Salkind received his PhD in human development from the University of Maryland, and after teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and Research in Education, where he collaborated with colleagues and work with students. His work then changed direction to focus on child and family policy, specifically the impact of alternative forms of public support on various child and family outcomes.

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Should you need additional information or have questions regarding the HEOA information provided for this title, including what is new to this edition, please email sageheoa sagepub. Please include your name, contact information, and the name of the title for which you would like more information., For instant access, get your copy of this interactive eBook via the VitalSource Bookstore , where you can choose from the or day rental options available.

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2 thoughts on “Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics by Neil J. Salkind

  1. "The author has a wonderful way of taking complex material and presenting it to an already anxiety-filled audience in a manner that not only sets students'.

  2. Neil J. Salkind received his PhD from the University of Maryland in Human Development, and after teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he remains.

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