Lord willing and the creek don t rise origin

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lord willing and the creek don t rise origin

If The Creek Dont Rise by Leah Weiss

A strikingly sincere portrait of a town and its buried secrets from an outstanding new voice in southern fiction.

In a North Carolina mountain town filled with moonshine and rotten husbands, Sadie Blue is only the latest girl to face a dead-end future at the mercy of a dangerous drunk. She’s been married to Roy Tupkin for fifteen days, and she knows now that she should have listened to the folks who said he was trouble. But when a stranger sweeps in and knocks the world off-kilter for everyone in town, Sadie begins to think there might be more to life than being Roy’s wife.

As stark and magnificent as Appalachia itself, If the Creek Don’t Rise is a bold and beautifully layered debut about a dusty, desperate town finding the inner strength it needs to outrun its demons. The folks of Baines Creek will take you deep into the mountains with heart, honesty, and homegrown grit.
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Published 19.12.2018

God Willin' & the Creek Don't Rise

Appalachian Language: “Lord Willing and the Creek Don’t Rise”

An on-line friend in the South said that it had to do with the Creek Indians. What is suggestive is that the phrase is wide-spread throughout the South, where the Creeks actually Muskogees lived and often came in conflict with Southerners. The Spanish tried to enslave them but the English set up trading posts to trade with them. Since the Creeks often had nothing to trade, periodically they would raid trading posts, resulting in conflicts. There was also the occasional out-and-out war. Settlers all over the US at the time spoke of one Creek and many Creek.

For what is your life? It is even a vapour , that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away. For that ye ought to say, If the Lord will, we shall live, and do this, or that. Some historians attribute Benjamin Hawkins as having been the first person to ever say these words and he did so in a letter to the President of the United States. Another commentator was rather blunt in his assessment of the above theory:. He married his common-law Creek wife on his death bed. Although there was an uprising by the Red Sticks, part of the Creek nation, Hawkins would not have referred to them generically as Creek because he was trying to protect the Creek nation from being penalized for the actions of the Red Sticks.

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The best known version of this originates from the Bible in James In the King James version, that which would have been used during the 18th and 19th centuries, this is, "For that ye ought to say, If the Lord will, we shall live, and do this, or that. By continuing, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Please set a username for yourself. People will see it as Author Name with your public flash cards.

It mentions Benjamin Hawkins of the late 18th century, who was asked by the US president to go back to Washington. Is this derivation correct? A Quite certainly not. Every researcher who has investigated the expression has dismissed an Indian connection as untrue. The tale is widely reproduced and believed nevertheless. If we relied on written sources it would be hard to believe in such continued use. The written record dates the saying from about the middle of the nineteenth century.

The idea, espoused below, that the remark should be attributed to Benjamin Hawkins is patently ridiculous. If you read the history attached to the citation, you'll see that Hawkins was devoted to the Creek. He married his common-law Creek wife on his death bed. Although there was an uprising by the Red Sticks, part of the Creek nation, Hawkins would not have referred to them generically as Creek because he was trying to protect the Creek nation from being penalized for the actions of the Red Sticks. Despite what M-W says, the remark was first said by Benjamin Hawkins, q. He wrote it in response to a request from the President to return to our Nation's Capital and the reference is not to a creek, but The Creek Indian Nation. If the Creek "rose", Hawkins would have to be present to quell the rebellion.

4 thoughts on “If The Creek Dont Rise by Leah Weiss

  1. Barring unforeseen circumstances. Lord willing and the creek don't rise, we'll have that new barn finished in time for the harvest.

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